Category Archives: Named Funds

What is a CURE Named Fund

With a gift of $25,000 or more, CURE Childhood Cancer will establish, at your request, a fund bearing the name you designate. These named funds offer ways for friends, family members, neighbors, colleagues, foundations and/or corporations to commemorate special individuals, such as a child who has battled cancer or an individual who has demonstrated dedication to the field of pediatric cancer. 



Individuals and families or other groups may combine gifts made over time to meet the minimum amount. Once a named fund is established, gifts may be designated to the fund at any time. Families and friends may choose to let others know that the fund has been established and invite others to join them in support of this lasting tribute.

Generally, donations to named funds are directed to a range of research and program areas conducted or supported by CURE Childhood Cancer, dictated by areas of greatest need. However, funds may be restricted to a mutually agreed upon purpose that fits within CURE’s mission and organizational goals.

If your interested in learning more about how you can create at Named Fund at CURE Childhood Cancer, contact Executive Director Kirstin Connor at kirstin@curechildhoodcancer.org or 770.986.0035.

Our Current Named Funds

The Sam Robb Fund was created in memory of Sam Robb who lost his battle with cancer on June 25, 2007. The purpose of the fund is first to fully fund one of the two CURE Fellows and secondly to help pay for prosthetic devices for children diagnosed with cancer.

The Catie Wilkins Memorial Fund was created in memory of Catie Wilkins who battled cancer for 3 years and 4 months before succumbing to this disease. The primary purpose of the Catie Wilkins Memorial Fund is to fund clinical research on childhood cancers.

The Hayley Hunter Research Fund was created in honor of 9-year-old Hayley Hunter who battled cancer in 2008 and is currently in remission. The purpose of the Hayley Hunter Research Fund is to provide funding for basic and clinical research relating to neuroblastoma, a pediatric cancer of the central nervous system.

“Press On”: The Patrick R. Chance Fund for Neuroblastoma Research was created in honor of 3-year-old Patrick R. Chance who was diagnosed with cancer in 2006. The purpose of Press On (the Patrick R. Chance Fund for Neuroblastoma Research) is to provide funding for basic and clinical research relating to neuroblastoma, a pediatric cancer of the central nervous system.

Trenton W. Kindred Research Fund was created in honor of Trenton Kindred, the five year-old son of Greg and Ginger Kindred, who was diagnosed in 2005 with high risk, Stage IV Neuroblastoma. However, Trenton has now been free of cancer since June 2006. Proceeds from the Trenton W. Kindred Research Fund will be used to support childhood cancer research, supporting the doctors and scientists of the Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Services of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine.

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Snow Cones for CURE Childhood Cancer

UnknownTrenton and Taylor Kindred have found a fun new way to help support CURE during this hot summer.  The boys have started selling Snow Cones in there front yard to raise money to donate to CURE.

They were $2.00 per yummy sno-cone and  the boys had lots of juicy flavors to choose from.  There were many guests that stopped by to help support CURE.

Last month Taylor and Trenton raised $57.00 and now to add to the CURE Sno Cones pot, they  raised an additional $210 yesterday.  So they boys raised a total of $258 for CURE. 

Ginger, Taylor and Trenton’s mother said, “They are so cute. I am so proud of them, as it is so hot out their today.  I can’t wait to have them drop it by CURE.”

The Kindred’s just recently announced a named fund in Trenton’s honor.  The fund is the Trenton W. Kindred Research Fund.  This is CURE’s 5th named fund and the proceeds from the Trenton W. Kindred Research Fund will be used to support childhood cancer research.  

Donate to The Trenton W. Kindred Research Fund

For more information on all of CURE’s named funds visit us at www.curechildhoodcancer.org

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CURE’s Newest Named Fund: The Trenton W. Kindred Research Fund

 

Trenton's RibbonCURE Childhood Cancer is proud to announce our 5th named fund, the Trenton W. Kindred Research Fund. This fund was created in honor of Trenton Kindred, who is the son of Ginger and Greg Kindred. Ginger Kindred is one of CURE’s board members and Greg is on CURE’s advisory board.

The Trenton W. Kindred Research Fund has a very specific purpose. Proceeds from the Trenton W. Kindred Research Fund will be used to support childhood cancer research – supporting the doctors and scientists of the Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Services of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine. We believe it is critically important to find a CURE for this beastly disease in our lifetime. Trenton was a fighter even at the young age trentonof 1, when he was diagnosed. He is still a fighter with a determination like we’ve never seen. Trenton has shown us howto embrace all the small joys of life. Our hope is that we WILL find a cure for Neuroblastoma, and we will be able to say that we did it because of Trenton and the support from our friends and family. We feel in our hearts that Trenton will inspire other childhood cancer patients to live life to the fullest. But first we must help find a cure for those who are suffering.

Trenton’s mom, Ginger Kindred has this to say on why they wanted to start the Trenton W. Kindred Research Fund:

“When Greg and I found out recently that “8” more of our cancer kids we’ve met through this journey had died in the past month, we knew we weren’t doing all we could for CURE. In fact, one of our Oncologist said that “it’s been terrible, as if it’s raining childhood cancer.” We knew we had to do more! Therefore, in honor of Trenton and what he has endured, and ALL these children and their fight, we want to expedite our funding efforts to find a cure sooner than later! We do not want to see other children suffer through what our son has been through, and all these children around us fighting so hard for their lives. Every little bit counts….thanks for supporting us in this fight.”

Donate to the Trenton W. Kindred Research Fund

To learn more about Trenton and the Trenton W. Kindred Research Fund, click here.

For more information on how you can start a named fund contact Kristin Connor   or visit us at www.curechildhoodcancer.org

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CURE Named Fund: Hayley Hunter

State Tourney 003Hayley Hunter is the 9 year old daughter of Eddie and Tammy Hunter of Ball Ground, Georgia. In April 2008, she was diagnosed with stage IV neuroblastoma, a rare and aggressive childhood cancer. It has taken surgery, six cycles of toxic chemotherapy, twelve rounds of radiation and an autologous stem cell transplant to rid Hayley of this disease. 

The current treatments available for neuroblastoma do not guarantee that Hayley is cured. Hayley is still at risk for relapse and is at risk for secondary cancers like leukemia and thyroid cancer, as well as infertility, scoliosis and other significant side effects.

Throughout treatment Hayley showed a lot of spunk. She never wanted to just sit at home and feel badly. Immediately after chemotherapy, she would insist on leaving the hospital and going to the movies with her brother, Ewing, or going to the basketball gym to watch her sister, Hannah, play basketball. It is our hope that we take Hayley’s same spunk to this fight against cancer as we strive to raise awareness of pediatric cancers and to raise money for the development of new and better treatments that lead to a cure.

UT and Bball 277The purpose of the Hayley Hunter Research Fund is to provide funding for basic and clinical research relating to neuroblastoma, a pediatric cancer of the central nervous system. Mainly affecting children, neuroblastoma is a cancer of the sympathetic nervous system, a nerve network that carries messages from the brain throughout the body. 

Researchers believe that neuroblastomas form when normal neuroblasts, the immature cells of the sympathetic nervous system, fail to mature into nerve cells and begin growing and dividing uncontrollably, leading to the growth of cancerous cells. Approximately six hundred children a year are diagnosed with neuroblastoma in the United States, the majority of which are under the age of five years. Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor found in children and accounts for half of all malignant cancers found in infants. Neuroblastoma most commonly starts as a solid mass in one of the adrenal glands, which are located above the kidney, or in the nerve tissues in the neck, chest, abdomen, or pelvis. The cause of neuroblastoma is unknown.

For information on how you can donate to the Hayley Hunter Research Fund visit us at www.curechildhoodcancer.org

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Caitlin Dopheide: Sacrifing her 13th Birthday

Unknown-1Caitlin Dopheide decided when she was 10 years old that she wanted to do a Charity Birthday party for her 13th party. CURE has a named fund in honor of Sam Robb and his family. Last year Sam Robb’s dad was Caitlin’s basketball coach, and she also goes to school with Sam Robb’s sister. When she heard the story of Sam and his life, she knew she wanted to raise money to support the Sam Robb Fund.

Caitlin’s birthday was on May 13th, and she had her party on May 16th. So instead of asking for gifts for herself, Caitlin asked that her friends and family donate to the Sam Robb Fund. Caitlin raised $1820.00. What an inspired young lady.Unknown

For information on how you can donate to the Sam Robb Fund or one of our other Named Funds check out the Named Funds page of our website.

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Catie’s Story – The Catie Wilkins Memorial Fund

Learn more about The Catie Wilkins Memorial Fund and how this awesome little girl changes our lives. 

About Catie

Catie Wilkins was the firstborn child of Tre’ and Jenny Wilkins.  A slight gross motor delay led to an eventual diagnosis of medulloblastoma, an aggressive brain tumor, on her first birthday.  Catie and her family were plunged into a world of doctors and surgeries and chemotherapies and medicines with little warning. 

Catie’s treatments included 12 surgeries, 4 different chemotherapy protocols and 6 weeks of radiation.  Her tumor continued to persist and eventually grow even through very harsh treatments.  She battled cancer for 3 years and 4 months before succumbing to a common virus due to an immune system that was compromised because of chemotherapy.

Catie battled cancer for most of her life, but more importantly, she lived FULL for her entire life.   Often people who hear that she fought this wretched disease for all but her first year feel that she must have had a rough existence.  Folks who think this did not know Catie.  She crammed a whole lot of living and fun and laughter into her all too short 4 years and nearly 4 months.

Catie was funny and tough, loving and mischievous.  She was quick to tease her daddy and you should have heard her laugh when she pulled something off on him.  Her favorite place on earth was the beach where she loved to catch hermit crabs and play in the sand.  She was an animal lover, with dogs and tree frogs topping her list of favorites. 

It’s impossible to capture the essence of Catie in just a few words.  She was, in some ways, just a normal kid.  But she was an old soul with a wisdom beyond her years.  Those who knew and loved Catie were forever changed by the enormity of her spirit and determination to live FULL in spite of what life threw at her.

Purpose of the Fund

The primary purpose of the Catie Wilkins Memorial Fund is to fund clinical research.  Research will include evaluating and treating the side effects (both acute and late effects) of treatment for childhood cancers, as well other research that CURE is supporting for more effective and less toxic treatments for childhood cancers.  

About Childhood Cancer 

Childhood cancer remains the number 1 disease killer of children, taking the lives of more children than asthma, diabetes, cystic fibrosis, congenital anomalies, and AIDS combined.  Research has improved survival rates.  Still more than 3,000 children die each year of cancer, and until a cure is found for all there is still work to be done.   Additionally, many survivors of pediatric cancers live with lifelong side effects from the treatments they received to survive.  The severity of late effects of treatment varies, but problems include (but are not limited to) decreased cognitive function, infertility, endocrine problems, growth abnormalities, hearing loss (moderate or severe), renal dysfunction, heart problems, and secondary malignancies.  Simply surviving is not enough.  More research is needed so that survivors of childhood cancers can not only live, but live well.  The Catie Wilkins Memorial Fund was established to support these research efforts.

To Donate to The Catie Wilkins Memorial Fund 

Click here and this will take you to the CURE Childhood Cancer website.  Simply Click give at the bottom of the page and type “Catie Wilkins Fund” in the comments section.  Your gift will be directed accordingly.  Checks can be  made out to CURE Childhood Cancer, with “Catie Wilkins Fund” written on the notes line. 

Mail checks to: 

CURE Childhood Cancer

1835 Savoy Drive, Suite 102

Atlanta, GA 30341

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CURE Childhood Cancer’s Named Fund Spotlight: The Sam Robb Fund

The Sam Robb Fund

This post is part of an on-going series that features our Named Funds for CURE Childhood Cancer. To learn more about our Named Funds, or to start one of your own, please click here.

About Sam

On June 25, 2007, Sam Robb succumbed to cancer that had returned with a vengeance. Although he is gone from this earth, his spirit and vitality live on in all whom he touched over his very full but very short 20 years.

Whether we live for a short time or live to 100 years, we all aspire to make a difference in some way, and Sam did exactly that. We are honored to share some of the highlights from a life courageously lived and full of accomplishment, enthusiasm and commitment.

Like many boys, Sam was focused on sports – primarily basketball and football. At 6’5″ and 230 lbs. in the 10th grade, Sam was a “Can’t Miss” college prospect starting in the first varsity football game at Blessed Trinity High School in Roswell, GA. As a sophomore, he led the team there to the first varsity victory in school history.

This is where the story begins…

In the fall of 2002, a nagging stress fracture in Sam’s left knee had to be addressed. X-rays were taken and the unthinkable became a reality…the diagnosis of bone cancer.

The medical term is osteosarcoma, which is bone cancer that presents itself in young people during growth spurts. The bad cell says, “I’m taking over,” and within three days, the protocol was set:

  • Three months of chemo pre-surgery;
  • Limb salvage surgery (versus amputation), which is essentially a knee replacement in a 16 year-old boy
  • More chemo to eradicate the cancer.

Unfortunately, Sam’s response to chemo was poor, with a 50% necrosis (tumor kill) putting him into a high-risk group. His odds for survival dropped from the 75% survival after five years class, to considerably less.

Most normal people would be despondent, angry…Not Sam! After hearing the news that his promising football career was over, he embarked on a new challenge as a baseball pitcher. Although it did not come easy, particularly with a prosthetic knee, he managed to play for a highly competitive East Cobb team, pitching and winning the final game of a world series in Tampa. Although he never would achieve elite athletic status, he loved being part of a team.

After high school graduation, he went on to Young Harris College, where he was a member of the baseball team. He was enrolled at Clemson University for fall 2007, but unfortunately, this would never come to fruition.

Osteosarcoma, when it reoccurs, tends to present in the lungs. In the spring of 2007, Sam began to experience fatigue and discomfort in his lungs. Eventually, he felt compelled to get things checked out. After four and a half years, Sam and his family felt that he had beaten the cancer demon. His previous scans were in the fall of 2006, with no signs of cancer present. In June 2007, a grapefruit sized mass was discovered to have grown and taken over his lungs and chest cavity.

Sam was dying from cancer. A number of nationally renowned doctors felt the surgery to remove the tumor was life-threatening. Eventually, a brave surgeon agreed with Sam to go for the “long ball” and remove the tumor…and a lung.

The weekend before surgery, Sam planned what would prove to be a real fare well tour. He visited UGA, attended Braves’ games and held court in the family’s basement.

He knew the severity of the surgery and he knew his time was limited. Sam never made it off the operating table. The tumor was too difficult to extricate.

In many ways, the outcome was blessed.

Sam never wanted sympathy, nor did he ever act like a sick person. He was good at everything except one thing – being sick.

He is gone but will never be forgotten. In many ways, he was bigger than life. His mantra, “Fightin Till the Last Breath,” lives on in all who knew him.

Purpose of The Sam Robb Fund

Proceeds from the Sam Robb Fund will be used for two primary purposes. First, the fund will support the Sam Robb Fellow at the Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorders Services of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University School of Medicine. We believe it is critically important to help train the pediatric oncologists of tomorrow, so that they are fully prepared for a lifetime of excellence in patient care, teaching and research – just like the doctors who cared for Sam. We know that one of these young doctors may make significant contributions to finding cures for childhood cancers, and we know that Sam would be proud to support their training. We are also proud to be able to help Emory and the Aflac Cancer Center and Blood Disorder’s Service of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta attract some of the nation’s best and brightest young doctors. These doctors care for children with cancer with unmatched skill and dedication, and the importance of providing them with the very best training and preparation for this vital and difficult work cannot be overstated.

Secondly, proceeds from the Sam Robb Fund will be used to help defray the costs of prosthetic devices for children with a cancer diagnosis who cannot afford to purchase and/or maintain them. Sam was determined to live life to the fullest and never let cancer rob him of the joys of life. Sam would want to encourage other children to follow his example, and through the Sam Robb Prosthetic Scholarship Fund, he will do that. The hope is that with the proper prosthetic devices, Sam will inspire childhood cancer survivors to return to a lifestyle that brings them happiness.

Introducing the 1st Sam Robb Fellow – Dr. Tanya Watt

Saturday evening June 21, 2008 we introduced Dr. Tanya Watt as the first Sam Robb Fellow to our family and friends. Many of you joined us for an evening of Remembrance and Resolve.

After graduating from Harvard University with a degree in biochemistry, Dr. Tanya Watt attended medical school at the University of Texas at San Antonio. She entered the pediatric residency program at Emory University, during which time she helped adapt the American Medical Association palliative care program to pediatrics. During her fellowship, Dr. Watt hopes to attain a Masters in Science of Clinical Research, thus giving her the tools and knowledge to successfully participate in clinical research, in addition to furthering her clinical abilities. She hopes to develop new chemotherapeutic regimens, in addition to promoting successful palliative care when medicine has reached its limits.

Click here to read the latest mid-year Research Update from Dr. Watt.

To Donate to The Sam Robb Fund

Click Here and type “Sam Robb Fund” in the Comments section. Your gift will be directed accordingly.

Special Events to Benefit The Sam Robb Fund

June 6, 2009 – An Evening to Celebrate with Dr. Tanya Watt, the Sam Robb Research Fellow.  For more information on the event, please contact Annamarie Robb at fightintillthelastbreath@gmail.com.

October 11, 2009 – The Sam Robb Memorial Golf Tournament on Legacy at Lake Lanier Islands.  For more information on the event, please contact Annamarie Robb at fightintillthelastbreath@gmail.com.

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